Ann Pettifor

Banking Crisis

Why Krugman’s ‘Keynesianism’ is controversial

Some of our friends were irked by my observation this week that Paul Krugman is: “an extremely controversial figure for Keynes scholars. He champions a mainstream interpretation of Keynes’s work known as the neo-classical synthesis” Many rightly applaud him for using his platform at the New York Times to defend further fiscal stimulus in the …

Why Krugman’s ‘Keynesianism’ is controversial Read More »

An open letter to the people of Greece: restore the Drachma

Unemployment poster ‘jobless men keep going, we can’t take care of our own’, 1931. We write to encourage you – to urge you on in your resistance. In your defiance, you understand Greece is slave to the interests of private wealth. You must understand too that it is private wealth that needs Greece. Greece does …

An open letter to the people of Greece: restore the Drachma Read More »

Bankers: draining funds from taxpayers courtesy of finance ministers

Irish Finance Minister Noonan and Luxembourg Treasury Minister Frieden attend an EU finance ministers meeting in Brussels. Image source: www.reuters.com I find it hard to write about the crisis in Greece….because the tragedy unfolding there is so reminiscent of the tragedies that unfolded in Africa, Latin America and South East Asia in the 80s and …

Bankers: draining funds from taxpayers courtesy of finance ministers Read More »

Austerity: OECD economists show clear signs of ‘cold feet’ for austerity

(Photo: REUTERS / Yiorgos Karahalis )A Greek riot policeman stands in front of graffiti written on the wall of a bank during violent demonstrations over austerity measures in Athens, May 5, 2010. Greece faced a day of violent protests and a nationwide strike by civil servants outraged by the announcement of draconian austeristy measures. Dear …

Austerity: OECD economists show clear signs of ‘cold feet’ for austerity Read More »

Is the banking system broke, as well as broken?

Much of the news of the last few weeks – the financialised commodities mania; the disgraceful abuse by the banks of payment protection insurance; the mortgage fraud which led US banks to rush through foreclosures without proper process and evict people from their homes;and their  decision reported  in the WSJ to offer a miserly $5 billion to …

Is the banking system broke, as well as broken? Read More »

Coming soon: another global financial crash? Capital mobility and the commodity mania

Tin produced at a Glencore plant in Vinto, Bolivia “Experience shows that when policies falter in managing capital flows, there is no limit to the damage that international finance can inflict on an economy.” Yilmaz Akyüz, “Capital Flows to Developing Countries in a Historical Perspective: Will the current Boom End with a Bust?” Today, as …

Coming soon: another global financial crash? Capital mobility and the commodity mania Read More »

‘Debtonation’ – why it’s still relevant

Welcome readers, to my newly refreshed blog, and thanks to Georgia Lee and Maz Kessler for making it look so good, and work so well. I had thought that the title needed refreshing too. After all, I am fond of defining 9th August, 2007 as ‘debtonation day’, and that is now long past. To refresh …

‘Debtonation’ – why it’s still relevant Read More »

Banking Commission: A huge, missed opportunity to prevent economic failure

 First posted on Left Foot Forward The Vickers Commission’s Interim Report on Banking is a huge missed opportunity; a betrayal, some might say. The report acknowledges the vast scale of the liabilities of the British banking system – private liabilities which at 450% of UK GDP eclipse Britain’s public debts of just 58% of GDP. As …

Banking Commission: A huge, missed opportunity to prevent economic failure Read More »